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Poentic & Plotter Kills—Putnam Road

Putnam Road is located just west of Schenectady, NY, and was named for the Pootman family.  Two creeks that are called in Dutch “kills” lead from Putnam Road down to the Mohawk River.  The Mohawk then flows eastward past Schenectady, NY.

Just above this point on the Mohawk River was the Old Harmanus Veeder Ferry twelve miles west of Schenectady.  The Veeder family was also connected with boat building.

Some members of the Veeder family used the name Vader.  Latin "Vado" means to a place where here are shallows, a fording place, or wading place.

The Veeder family married into the Groot family, whose ancestor in the new World was a boatswain who settled in Schenectady.

According to ancestry.com, Veeder means a boggy place.

John Baptist Van Epps who was a fur trader, owned the Upper Ferry dock, and operated a fleet of boats from Schenectady.

When Johannes Pootman's employer Philip Henderickse Brower died about 1664, Brower's estate was purchased by Johannes Dirckse Van Eps and they had Jan Baptist Van Eps.

Johannes Van Eps, the son of Jan Baptist Van Eps, was born May 5, 1700.  He married Neeltje Toll 28 Oct 1720. Neeltje is the daughter of Carel Hanse Toll. He lived on the north side of the Mohawk, near Veeders [later Hoffman's] Ferry, on land received from his father-in-law, Carel Hanse Toll.

 According to Wikepedia.com, Plotter Kill is most likely a corruption of Platte Kill.

The English word plouter means to splash about or to wade while plotus means to float.

 I find it interesting, and bear with me, that the following website says that the name Pottman means a boater, a shipper, or a skipper of a “Pott” or flat bottom boat that we may also call a punt. 

The link below shows Angle—Dutch translations that include those for a punt.

 http://www.kranenburgia.nl/dixo2.asp

The pictures in this article are simply wonderful!

Punter

Punter

In Germany today, “pott” means a ship or tub.  Since "mann" means a worker or laborer, Pottman hence means a shipman or boatswain.

 The word “pott” also seems to be connected with “poth” meaning a shallow piece of water. 

From poth and poot we may get the meaning of Pootman  as Pondman,Puddleman, or Poolman;  however, is that truely correct for the meaning of our family name?

I note that the Pothamann family of Beeck, Germany, on the Rhine River near Duisenberg, also used the name Auf dem Potth and Pootman. They were swine farmers it appears and distributed liquid fertilizer, which is another story I may get into with time.

To be short however, "poot" or "poth" at that locality meant swine-manure pit and "pooten" meant to spray liquid manure.

Lets however not be sidetracked with that notion of Pottman and return to the meaning of a the navigator of the beautiful watercraft the punt.

 While the Putman family of Schenectady, NY, used the spelling of Potman frequently, David Pootman, a sibling of those in Schenectady and the brother who went to New Jersey and his descendants used the surname Pottman for nearly a hundred years.

Johannes Pootman the immigrant ancestor of the Dutch-American Putman family to America is recorded with the spelling of his last name as Pottmann.  

“Pott” in his surname may have meant punt, and the ending “mann” meant he was a punter or flat bottom boat skipper or skipper of a "tub".

  “Mann” with two "n's" is a suffix that is used only in Germany and means a worker hence in our situation perhaps a boater.

The name Pottmann strongly implies that Johannes Pootman had a Germany ancestry even thought his parents seemed to have lived in Aalburg, Netherlands.

In 1678 in an Albany, NY, Petit Court, the surname Johanis Pottman of Schenectady is also listed.

Punting

Punting on a Shallow River

 Perhaps, Poentic Kill was Punter’s Creek or even Pottmann’s Creek.

It is recorded that the creek was named for the Van Vechten family who were called Poenties.

The Latin word for punt is "ponto".

The Dutch words "pont" and "veerpont" mean ferry.

In Dutch the word "punt" means a "platteboot" or flatboat.

Bottman was a surname that common to the descendants of Arent Janse Pootman who was an early member of our Pootman/Putman family.

In Middle English the surnames Batman, Botman, and Bottman mean boatman.  Also in Old Angle, Botman also meant boatman!

Click here to read the early meaning of the English surname Bottman.

In regards to the place name near Schenectady Plotter Kill. or Platte Kill, perhaps, this is another indication of the heritage of the Putman and possibly the Van Vechten family meaning "Punter Creek"!

A Punter

A Punter

 The YDNA of the Vom Broel de Plater family of Westhemmerde, Germany, is identical to that of the Putnam family.

I note that a possible point of connection between the two families occurred in 1539 when Anna Von Pentlinck married Henry Vom Broel de Plater and who had a son named Frederick about whom little is known. 

 Henry Vom Broel de Platter had other children who are documented.

 Was the name Pentlinck/Puentlinck a form of the word “punter” and means a small flat bottom boater.

The German word "platte" today means a piece of wood, tile, slab, or plate. 

Ancestry.com says that the surname Platter means a person who lives on a plateau or flat piece of elevated land while Plater seems to mean an armor or sheet metal worker.

The French word "plate" means a punt or very small flat bottom boat or a boat with a flat bottom and square ends used for transportation of bulky freight, especially used in shallow waters

Hence in French de plater would be a punter.

A "playt" in Old Angle was a "platte vrachboot" or a flat freight boat.

According to an early German lexicon book, the word "plattmann"means a person who operated a flat-bottom boat, which was called a "platte".

 The family Vom Broel de Platter acquired the [estate] de Platter by marriage about the middle of the 12th Century.

 Today in Germany a flat bottom boat is called a "stocherkahn”, or “stochern”.   “Stake” means a  punt or barge pole.  Kahan” means a punt, barge, or old tub.

I wonder if the name Plotter Kill or Platter Kill may elude or reference the earlier days when perhaps the Pootman/Pottmann family was known as de Plater?

It should be noted that the Johannes Pootman family lived on Ferry Street in Schenectady:  Ferry street was called because at its foot witht he Mohawk River one of the gates of Schenectady opened to the landing place for its boats, canoes and the only scow or punt.

The Mohawk River was crossed by no bridges then.

The village, and the sparse population on the north side of that river maintained communication by water except in the winter season.

In Dutch a ferry was called a "veere" or "pont".

History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614--1925, Chapter 81: Mohawk River Navigation" says the following about the early boats on the river:

The Mohawk Indians, living on the river shores and frequently changing their habitations from the south to the north side and back again, used bark canoes and dugouts to traverse the river. These were doubtless also used by the first white explorers and traders. After Schenectady was settled, in the lower Mohawk valley in 1661, probably the flat bottomed "scow skiff," propelled by oars, made its appearance. From this was evolved the larger flat or flatboat or batteau, propelled by oars, poles and sails, which appeared on the Mohawk about 1725. They were generally built in Schenectady, which quickly developed into a thriving and busy Mohawk River port and boat-building center. These boats were in use by traders, settlers and soldiers to carry goods, farm produce and war material until after the Revolution. They carried from one to two tons, their size being determined by the fact that they had to make two land carries on the river trip.

Early Mohawk River Boats

Early Mohawk River Boats

I find it interesting that Christoffel Davidse who was a brother-law of Johannes Pootman was a skipper on the North or Hudson River.

David Pottman of New Jersey and a son of Johannes Pootman reportedly married Elizabeth Beekman whose last name according to Ancestry.com means a person who lived by or worked on a small stream or creek. 

Perhaps, Beekman is more closely associated with "riverman" meaning a person who worked on a river.

It appears descendants of David Pottman worked river rafts down the Delaware River in the 1700's.

Early Log Raft Down the Delaware River

Early Log Raft down the Delaware River

 

Putman/Pootman DNA Update

The following chart from Ysearch.org shows the closeness between the Vom Broich, Broele-De Plater, and Putman [Pootman] families when comparing 30 DNA STR markers and using the De Plater family as the base.  You may note that the De Plater DNA marker values area closer to two Putman's then those Putman's are to two other Putman members.

I would guess that the de Plater and Putman families are connected within the last 500 years.

I looked for Potman families at Familysearch.org in or near Westhemmerde, Germany, which was where the Vom dem Broel de Plater family once lived, and while I found no Potman's the family name Poot/Poet, which likely means pool, was somewhat common while you don't see it  that commonly elsewhere.

 Just three miles north of Westhemmerde is the farming town of Flierich where there was a resident in the late 1600's by the name of Victor Poit, Poet, or Pott.

At this time and location, place or estate names were common such as Poot, which means at the pool, and Broel, which means in the copse in the  bog or moor.  Broel is likely connected with "brook" as is the surname Vom Broich. The Boel family was from Brohl Pond, which is north of Westhemmerde.

 It seems that Victor Poet may have been connected with the later 1700's hamlet of Poth's Kotten, or Poth's Farms that was in Ostflierich,  or "East Flierich".

 At this location today is the town called Pedinghausen that was once the location of a salt-spring or well.  "Pede" meant well.

Within a mile southeast of Pedinghausen is Pentlinger Weg, or Road, which is about a mile northeast of the town of Hilbeck.  The Pentling family was once Lord of Hilbeck, and Anna Pentling in 1539 married Henry Vom Broel de Plater of Westhemmerde.

The Hugenpoth family was also once, I believe later, a resident of Westhemmede and was Lord of Hilbeck. 

I don't yet see a connection between the Hugenpoth and Poot/Poet/or Poit/or Poth families.

In note that  in Zeitschrift für vaterländische Geschichte und Altertumskunde, Volumes 1-50,  the "pfarrer" or minister of the Flierich, Germany, was Heinrich Victoris, and it is my guess that Victor Poit/Poet/Poth may have been a descendant of Heinrich Victoris.

The given name Victor was common in Flierich, Germany, by 1700 but uncommon elsewhere.  It was also somewhat common in Schwerte, Germany, which is nearby Unna and a somewhat longer distance away to the southwest of Fleirich.

in 1606 Heinrich Victoris was pastor of Flierich, and his son Stephen Victoris later became its minister in 1624.

I find the following interesting:

Dresbach stellt dennoch Einzelheiten über den mehrfachen Wechsel zwischen lutherischem und reformiertem Bekenntnis der Fliericher Pfarre dar:  Der 1590 gestorbene Pastor Wilbrand von Raesfeld führte die lutherische Reformation ein, zu Ende geführt wurde sie durch dessen Nachfolger Pastor Jobst Schlicker und Vikar Gottfried Brockmann. 1611 erschien dann mit Heinrich Viktoris ein Fliericher Pastor auf der reformierten Synode zu Unna. Sein Sohn Stephan Viktoris ließ sich hingegen am 13.10.1629 vom Soester Ministerium zum lutherischen Pastor in Flierich ordinieren. Sein Nachfolger nach seinem Tod 1636 wurde mit Bernhard Westhof wieder ein Lutheraner, der vorher nur für Drechen zuständig war und 1641 nach Asseln berufen wurde. Danach gab es in Flierich wie in Drechen nur noch reformierte Prediger.

There is more information on Heinrich  and Stephen Viktoris from the same source below.

http://repositorium.uni-muenster.de/document/miami/7be52264-f870-4130-bb82-37010237838b/3_Text.pdf

Heinich Viktoris who was minister and Pastor of Flierich was a member of the Unna, Germany, Synod. 

In 1699 Henrich Stephen Pot was christened whose parents are unknown at the Evangelical Church of Flierich.

Victor Poit had a son named Hinrich Poit christened at the same church in 1684.

 

Compare User ID Pedigree Last Name Origin Haplogroup Tested With Markers Compared Genetic Distance
6HEHT   Broele De Plater Brohle, Westhemmerde, Germany  Unknown  Ancestry.com  33 0
DD8VD   Putnam Hamm, Westphalia, Germany  Unknown  Family Tree DNA  30 0
GTZGV   Putman Netherlands  Unknown  Family Tree DNA  30 0
J5JPA   Berry Scotland  I1 (tested)  Family Tree DNA  30 1
VA25H Show Putnam Aalburg, Nord-Brabant, Netherlands  I1 (tested)  Family Tree DNA  30 1
XWFKD   Nguyen Vietnam  Unknown  Family Tree DNA  30 1
EFS62 Show Broich Elsdorf, Rheinland/Rhineland, Germany  I1 (tested)  Family Tree DNA  30 1
79VEY   Putnam Unknown  Unknown  Family Tree DNA  30 1

Grafschaft Mark -- South of Hamm, Germany

Above is the area south of Hamm, Germany, that includes West Hemmerde & Flierich

 

The Pootman/Putman Family & the Given Name "Cornelius"

I was thinking today, "The name Cornelius is very prevalent in the Low Countries and not in Germany, and since the given name Cornelius was used in the Pootman/Putman family there likely was an early Pootman ancestor [named Cornelius] from the Low Countries:  the Netherlands or Begium!"

On the internet the following passage is commonly seen:

Cornelius:  From an old Roman family name, Cornélius, which is of uncertain origin, possibly a derivative of Latin cornu ‘horn’. This was the name of a 3rd-century pope who is venerated as a saint. The name was particularly popular in the Low Countries, and immigrants contributed to its frequency in the north of England from the 1400s. However, it is now seldom used in Britain.

I  would like to present the idea that because the immigrant ancestor of the Putman family was Johannes Pootman; because he named his children in order: Maria, Arent, Victor, David, Catherine, and Cornelius; and because Arent and Catherine were family names used by or from his wife's side of the family, Johannes Pootman's mother must have been a Maria  [Davidse] and his father a Victor.  Maria's mother's father may have been a Cornelius.  The Dutch were strict in their naming patterns for children, which were done in a manner similar to the above. 

I've guessing that Johannes Pootman's maternal grandmother was a daughter of a Cornelius and that Maria'a ancestry originated in the Low Countries.  Victor Pootman may have been born in Germany while his wife Maria born in the Netherlands.

 

Johannes Pootman [Putman] & Cornelia Bradt

This site has histories or stories about the Dutch Putman family whose first home in America was the Mohawk River Valley in northern New York:  The American ancestors of the family were Johannes Pootman and Cornelia Bradt.

Johannes Pootman's parents were likely Victor and Maria Davids Pootman of Aalburg, North Brabant, Netherlands. 

Victor was born about 1620 and was a Latin school teacher in Aalburg.

The children of Johannes Pootman and Cornelia Bradt all born in Schenectady, NY, were the following:

1.    Maria Pootman, Potman, or Putman who married Steven Bedent.  Maria was born about 1678.

2.    Arent Pootman or Putman who married Elizabeth Akkerman.  Arent was born about 1680 in Schenectady, NY.

3.    Victor Pootman, Puttman, or Putman who married Margaret Mabie.  Victor was born about 1682.

4.    David Pootman or Pottman who married possibly Helena Van Gelder and second Elizabeth Beeckman.  David was born about 1684.

5.    Catherine Pootman, Potman, or Putman who married Cornelius Post.  Catherine was born about 1689.

6.    Cornelius Pootman, Potman, or Putnam who married Jacomyntje Viele.  Cornelius was born about 1672.

 

Schenedtady City Map 1750

Schenectady City Plan 1750

 

Descriptions of each descendant of the above six children are found under the link "Family" at the top of this page or just click their names on the list just created. 

I wrote the stories in PDF formats that may not be as well searched by google.com; however, the format for me is easier  for script creation and any later correction.

I hope you will enjoy the site.

Feel free to send me an email  for any comments that you may like to make that will help improve the Putman Family  Bulletin website.

Over the last few years, I have concentrated on discovering the European history of the family, which is really a bit cloudy, but now I would like to return again to more recent information on the Putman family.

If you have something you would like to read or contribute, please let me know and send along an email to me.

I hope you find this work interesting:  I will start with Johannes Pootman's birthplace, first, which is bit of a controversy.

The earliest histories of the Pootman or Putman family in Europe and even before are located here at the following pages or links . . .

Pootman or Putman YDNA / Pootman European Roots.

 

Nativity of Johannes "Jan" Pootman

The founder of the Mohawk Valley, NY, Pootman / Putman / Putnam Family in the USA was Johannes Pootman who was born "about" 1644 or 1645 according to his apprenticeship papers of  1661, Albany, NY.

According to the way the Dutch named their children at that time, Johannes Pootman's father was likely  a "Victor" and his mother was likely "Maria" as children Arent and Catherine were named for Cornelia's parents.

Many people have the father of Johannes Pootman as Rutger Putman[us]; however, never was the name Rutger used by the Pootman [Putman] family of the early Mohawk River, which according to the Dutch manner of naming children should have occurred.

However, there was a Victor and Maria Pootman who lived in Aalburg, The Netherlands, at the time Johannes Pootman was born!

A Jan [Johannes] Pootman the son of Victor Pootman and Maria Davids was baptized on Feb 28, 1644, in Wijk en Aalburg in what was then South Holland and is now the Province of North-Brabant. The Netherlands. 
Jan Pootman's birth date was likely on or a few days prior to the 28 Feb 1644 date.  Jan's siblings were Geuntjen [perhaps Geertje], David and Marija.  Jan's parents were married in Wijk en Aalburg, Noord-Brabant, and Jan and his siblings were baptized and born there. 

Information is available from the following page:  Brabants Historisch Informatie Centrum: 

http://www.bhic.nl/index.php?id=10004

In the box "Achternamen" [surname] enter Pootman and click " Zoeken" [search] in the above link.

The BHIC website was discovered in December 2009 by Katherine E. McMullen-Serrault a direct descendant of Jan Pootman through her father Carl Eugene Putman, EdD of Wisconsin who are also a family historian. 

Victor Pootman was a Latin schoolmaster in Aalburg, Noord-Brabant.  The tradition of the Putman family was that Johannes Pootman's father was a dominee in Holland.  Sometimes the word "dominee" is used for a  "schoolmaster" while more commonly is meant a Dutch minister.

Johannes and Cornelia Pootman's first son Arent married Elizabeth Akkerman whose family was from the area of S'Hertogenbosch just a few miles east of Aalburg.  Also, Cornelia's stepfather Klaus Van Bokhoven was from Bokhoven, which is only a couple of miles east of Aalburg.

Mrs. McMullen-Serrault's  discovery would not have been possible without the work of her father as well as several other genealogists whose work is more widely known. 

The source for the Victor Pootman and Marie Davids family records was an index prepared by an unknown person from the damaged original records.  Unfortunately, no copies of the original records are available from BHIC as only the index was made available to them.  All information available from the BHIC for these records is already reported within their Web database.  

 

Ontario Information and Query

Rose Creamer descends from Mary Rebecca Putman who was born 1861 in Niagara, , Lincoln Co. Ontario, Canada. 

Rebecca was the daughter of Henry Putman and Elizabeth Bowie.  

Rose does not have the year of death for Mary Rebecca.
Mary Rebecca Putman married Samuel Sheppard Jan 1, 1884.  Samuel was born in 1860 and died in 1899 at the age of 39.

Their line of their descendants who all lived in Niagara were the following:

1.  Alice Maud Sheppard:  She was born in 1886 and died in 1975.  Alice married Charles B. Purdon who was born in 1883 and died February 7, 1907.

Their children were the following:  Mildred H. Purdon 1907-1907;  Cora Alice Purdon1908-1997 (Rose's mother); twin Purdon boys (unnamed) 1909-1909; Helen Mary Purdon born in 1911 (no death date); Samuel Bernard Purdon 1912-1999; and Reeva Inez Purdon 1918-1994.
2.  Sheppard Baby (female unnamed):  Born and died 1891-1891.
3.  Mabel Inez Sheppard. She was born in 1893 (no death date).  Mabel never married.

4.  Mary Edith Sheppard.  Mary was born in 1896 and married Charles F. Currie May 16, 1917. They did not have children.

 For more information on this family see the following link and search for the respective names.  Henry Putman who married Elizabeth Bowie was the son of Jacob Putman who married Rebecca Young the son of Henry Putman who married Hannah Anguish:

http://www.putmanfamily.org/Family/Arent%20Janse%20Pootman.pdf
 
http://www.putmanfamily.org/Family/More%20on%20Arents%20Line.pdf

 

The Putman Linage in YDNA Language

Six male Putman's [Pootman's] that descend from Johannes Pootman of Schenectady, NY, have closely matching YDNA results as shown by the link below:

http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/putnam/results

The results show mutations between the six Putman's that will help to differentiate the different branches of the Johannes Pootman and Cornelia Bradt family.

The following link at the same website shows the line Patriarch line for each participant:

http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/putnam/pats

 The closest match to the original yDNA of Johannes Pootman is likely held by member 137627 or Carl Putman, EdD.

 

Dominus Victorius de Puteo Miles Draconis

The above title may be translated as Clergyman Victor Putman Knight of the Dragon Order.  While just searching the Internet and entering the words “de Puteo”, I came across Lindworm and the Dragon Order that mentioned Vctorius de Puteo.  

Victorius de Puteo was a German Knight it appears who fought in the last Crusade that began in 1396.  The reason perhaps why it took me so long to find this gem of information was because the passage was written in Latin and German:

Ein anderer sehr geachteter Orden war der Lintwurm- oder Drachen-orden. Diese Gesellschaft ist, wie gewöhnlich angenommen wird, von Kaiser Sigismund gegründet worden, indessen wird schon in einem Testamente von 1397 ein dominus Victorius de Puteo miles draconis genannt.  [Deutsches leben im XIV. und XV. jahrhundert, Volume 2, by Alwin Schultz]

I interpret the above as saying: 

One other very highly thought of order was the Lindworm or Dragon Order.  This society was established by Emperor Sigismund.  In a testament from 1397 a Clergyman Victorius de Puteo was named as a Knight of the Dragon Order.

The Moslem Bayazid I began a siege of Constantinople in 1391. The siege was still on when Sigismund led his famous "Crusade of Nicopolis" (1396) to aid Byzantium against the Moslems.

 Sigismund was supported by Balkan rulers and by French, German, and English knights.  

The Crusade was not successful.  After an initial success, Sigismund's army was completely overwhelmed.  As a result of this defeat, Sigismund evacuated Dalmatia , the Turks dominated the Balkans, and the southern frontier of Transylvania suffered repeated Moslem raids.

On a side note, the German given name “Linda” is said to be connected with lindworm and means sea-serpent, sea-monster, or sea-dragon.

Example of a Lindworm, Sea-Snake, or Sea-dragon

A Lindworm, Sea-snake, or Sea-dragon

 

Lindwurm and Linda bring to mind to me Hendrich Ther Linden-Pootman who had children baptized at the Evangelistic Church of Friemersheim, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany, in the late 1600’s.  Perhaps the addition to his name meant snake or dragon.

Linden  also means  lime tree.

The reference above is the first and only time I have seen the name Victor or Victorius together with the surname de Puteo.  I wonder if Victor Pootman of Aalburg, Netherlands, who appears to have been the father the Dutch-American immigrant Johannes Pootman, may have been a descendant of Victorius de Puteo?

At this same time, or about 1400, in Dortmund, Germany, Segebode de Puteo or ton Putte lived whose name was Lower German and meant "Victory's Master".  In German Sieger means Victor.  Perhaps, the name Victorius de Puteo was the Latinized name of the German name Segebode ton Putte. 

 Perhaps, Victorius de Puteo was indeed Segebode de Puteo of Dortmund, Germany.

Segebode de Puteo or ton Putte may possibly have had a descendant  name Victor Poet or Pott who lived southeast of Dortmund in a small town named Flierich, or an  even smaller area called Pedhausen, Germany.

Pedhausen seems to mean Pit House, and a "manor" called Pottskotten was also there.

The Dortmund de Puteo family went by the names de Pote, de Poto, de Putte, ton Putte, van dem Putte, and Poet and possibly Potman.

  

Dortmund Abt. 1610

 

The de Pote Family of Dortmund, Germany

Was the de Pote family the ancestral line of the Pootman family?  I'm having fun trying to prove that it was part of our family history.  It would be nice if someone from Northwestern Europe would be interested in taking a DNA test if they are a male with the surname Pote, Poet, Poetman, or Pootman.

At https://familysearch.org/ , I typed in the "Victor" for first name, "Po*" for last name, "Germany" for the place, and "1000 to 1750" for the time frame, and I found  some interesting events.

A Victor "Poet, Poit, or Pott lived in Flierich, Germany, which is just southeast of Dortmund. 

The de Pote, de Puteo, or  Van Dem Putte family was from Dortmund.  Searching elsewhere on the internet, I found that there is a street or rather an alley called Pottgasse in the City of Dortmund.

The Ratsherren de Pote, or the Pote family, lived in the  Haus Pote on Pottgasse.  Alley in German is "Gasse".

In the old City of Dortmound, on the 1610 map of the town, other streets are Karpfenpoth meaning "Carp  Pool" and nearby Pottgieser Strasse, meaning likely jar pourer or maker street.

De Pote, de Puteo, and Van Dem Putter mean from the pit. 

From researching the German and Latin documents of early Dortmund, about 1250  to 1350, it seemed that an Alfvinus de Puteo may have been in the business of mining stone and owned a quarry called in German a "Steinbruch" and in Latin a "Spelunc Lapidee".  

John de Pote was a predictus or preacher who appears to have been in charge of furnishing stone for Dortmund, which was brought to city in cart-loads or tuns.

Mining stone often also produced a source of water because the shaft or hole would fill with water.

About two miles southwest of Dortmund today is Pottenkamp, which means Potts-field, and within about a mile or less is the place in the town of Schuren called Steinbruch.  From Steinbruch many of the stones for the building of Dortmund came that were used to build St. Reinoldi and St. Peter Churches where the Pott/Poet/Pote family members were baptized.

Whether the Putman family of the Mohawk Valley descends from "Haus Pote", needs much more research.  

Below is a cutting fromMuhler's drawing of Dortmund from about 1611.  Potgasse is listed as "19" near the center and top of the drawing:

 

Dortmund 1611 & Potgasse

http://www.dortmund.de/media/p/denkmalbehoerde_1/downloads_4/heftreihe/Bausteine_und_Fundstuecke.pdf

 

The early map of the City of Dortmund that Detmar Mulher drew shows St. Martin's Chapel left above.  The left contour shows the city moat, wall, and tower.  Windmill Mound is recognizable by the cannons.   Red Tower is in the lower center.  At the upper contour, runs Salt or Light Road, the Helleweg. 

At center is Silver Street [Silberstrasse] and Courtyard Street [Hövelstrasse]. 

North of the St. Martin's Chapel and south of St. Peter's Church is Pote Alley. 

Below is the Dortmund, Germany, 1894  Stadt Plan that better shows Pottgasse of Pote Alley:

 

Dortmund, Germany, City Map 1894

 

The picture below from Work Laws, the Saxon Code of the 1300's, shows two horses, a waggoner, and cart. 

The presentation explained the Traffic Regulations of the time .  Because of increased  building projects particularly in the cities, examples of the cart-wagons that needed to be used to convey material for example from the quarries by way of the roads using a cart were drawn.

Road Cart for Quarries by Saxon Law

 

Vom Broich family Connection to the Pootman family

+In the 1600’s, the Vom Broich [Vom Bruch] and the Pottman, Potman, Poet, Poetmann, Poit,  Poitman, Poth, and Pothman families are seen in the same places in Germany.

The Vom Broich and Pootman/Putman family Y-DNA are similar.  the two families have a common ancient perhaps within the 1,000 years. 

 At https://familysearch.org/, from records of the 1600’s, the Vom Broch and Vom Bruch families are found in Dortmund, Opherdicke [Unna], Mettmann,  Gerresheim [Cologne], and Olpe [near Kuerten].

 Poet ,Poetman, Poit, Poitmann, Pottmann, Potmann, Poth, and Pothman families are also primarily in these places.  

 Today these names are found at a high frequency in Rheinisch-Bergischer Kries, which includes Kuerten, and also in Mettmann, Dortmund, and Unna .

 Opherdecke is famous for its early [Zechen or] coal-mines, but one must keep in thought that coal mining really only started in the 1500's in the Ruhr Valley, the Ruhrpott.   

A pitman is a coal-miner or worker in a stone quarry.  Sometimes the German word “bruch” is used to mean a quarry such as the German word steinbruch.  De Puteo  and early surname used before the 1500's meant a water, salt, or stone pit.

The Vom Broich family whose Y-DNA test is close to our Putman Y-DNA originated in Kuerten, Germany, in the Rheinisch-Bergischer Kries or region. 

Near Kuerten in the Rheinisch-Bergischer Kries is Cologne [Koeln]  with its suburb of Gerrsheim.  In 1638 Adolff Vom Bruyck married Elssgen Zu Poit.  They may have lived in Kuerten but were married in Gerresheim, Cologne, Germany.

The surname Poit is also seen in the 1600’s in northwestern Germany in Flierich in the region of Unna where in the late 1600's lived Victor Poit. 

The Poit's from both Dortmund and Kuerten, Germany, may be related but only time and research will tell for sure.  

 Sometimes a person had two names that reflected the father's surname or estate and the mother's estate, so both names th eVom Broich and Poit [Pootman] may have been used by the same person. 

My guess is the Poit/Vom Broich family was from the Dortmund region, and two branches of the family became known as Poit and Vom broich. 

The Pootman/Putman family and the Brohle-de Plater family seems also to be connected perhaps throught a name such as broile/broich. 

 http://www.verwandt.de/karten/absolut/pottmann.html

On another note, Preussisches Wörterbuch, 1883,  indicates that Pott means jar while Poett means a pit.

In German Pottman means a jar maker while Poettman means a pitman.  North of the Lippe River, Puettmann is the form of Pitman.

 

The Puettmann Family and the Pootman Family

Victor Pootman who lived in Aalburg, Gelderland, Netherlands, was likely the father of Johannes Pootman the immigrant ancestor of the Mohawk Valley Putman family.  Victor Pootman was a Latin School master in Aalburg beginning about 1642.  He was born about 1620 and married Maria Davids.

The first name "Victor" is not  very common but was used in Germany by the Puettmann and the Poet/Poit families.  I would guess that our Pootman family that descends from Johannes Pootman did not descend from the Puettmann family because the however the Puetmann family was Catholic and our Pootman family was Reformed or Evangelical. 

However, it is possible that the Puettmann of Duelmen, Germany descends from the Vom Brunnen De Puteo family of the region near Soest, Germany and that the de Puteo  and possibly the Poit family of the Dormund region also came from the same Soest family

It may be that both the families originated in  salt mining  region Regio Puteo that is just southeast of Soest.  

The early Ten Putte family of Duelmen who was likely later the Puettmann family seems to be a branch that descends from Everhardus Vom Brunnen de Puteo of Ahlen, Germany, which is just northwest of Soest.  The Ten Putte family used the given name Evert, too.

In German "Brunnen" means fountain or spring.  The Latin word "puteo" means well or spring but also pit or quarry.  The addition of Brunnen seems to specify a water pit.  Vom Brunnen de Puteo is German and Latin referencing the name with the same meaning. 

The Vom Broich family of Kuerten, Germany, is the closest to our Pootman family in both Y-YDNA STR and SNP values, and  at ancestry.com the Brohle-de plater family is also a very close match.  The name Bruhle or Brohle means hollow, lowland, or swampland and may also reference a pit.

In  Roman times, the German people between the Ems and Lippe River were the Bruckteri whose name means basically brook people. The Bruckteri eventually migrated south of the Lippe River.

The Vom Brunnen De Puteo surname  seems to come from or near Soest where about 1225 Johannes Vom Brunnen De Puteo was recorded.  

During Roman times, there was a region southeast of Soest called "Puteo Regis" or "Regio Puteo".  Today the area is called Westernkotten and is also just northeast of Erwitte, Germany.  Early records call Westernkotten "Kothe".   Early German Western cottages has been suggested as the meaning of Westernkotten.

Bad-Westernkotten is formed around a salt well called Sole-Thermen.  In German "sole" means salt-water while "thermen" means thermal or hot spring.  "Sol thermen" means salt thermal spring or bath.  "Bad" in German means bath.

The Low German word "sood" also means spring or well, and Bad-Westernkotten was likelwise called "Koning's Sood" meaning the King's Salt-well.

In the 1300's, at St. Anne Kappelle, Johann Vam Sode de Puteo is listed whose name also meant salt-well. 

There was likewise a Bruno Hautekaufer known as Bruno Sode de Puteo.  These two de Puteo's seem to have lived in the Hanover area of Germany.

The German word  "sode" today means turf or sod, but anciently it meant salt-works or well.

The Pootman family perhaps descends from the Vom Brunnen de Puteo family of Soest, Germany, which is west of Lippestadt.  It is said a branch of the de Pote  family was originally  also from Soest.

About 1650 there  were a number of  Brune/Brunnen families in the Erwitte region, Poetman families south in Altengeseke, Poet families in Dortmund, and Puettmanns north of the Lippe River.

The root surname Puette is seen north of the Lippe River and is associated with Catholic churches while the root Poot/Poit/Poet is seen south of the Lippe River and seen more in Evangelical churhes.    They both may however come or originate from the same region the Puteo Regio.

 

The de Puteo, de Poto, or Pote family of Dortmund, Germany

At an early date there was no surnames such as Putman, and even at a later date, it was often up to the deacon or priest to write a person's surname often a place, occupational, or estate name in records. 

Early in Germany if the meaning of a person's calling was pitman or wellman, in Latin, it would have been written as de Puteo.  

 In Latin, “puteus” means a well, spring, or pit. 

http://www.pooth.de/chronik.htm 

In Dortmund, Germany, the earliest mention of the name de Puteo was Alffwinus de puteo who was on the Councilman Registry for Dortmund in 1239.  His name likely meant Elf's Friend.

 Bertramus de Puteo was listed in 1241.

On the Councilmen Registries for Dortmund, the following de Puteo's were listed with names such as de Poto, Poth, de Pote, Von Puteo, and Van Dem Putte. 

The De Puteo Time Line

1239       Alffwinus de Puteo

1241       Bertrammus de Puteo

1253       Bertrammus de Puteo

1255       Gerhardus Poth

1257       Arnoldus de Poto

1263       Alvinus de Puteo

1270       Bertramus de Puteo

1271       Alvinus de Puteo

1271       Bertram de Puteo

1272       Hinricus de Pote

1286       Wulvino de Puteo

1287       Albertus de Puteo

1289       Albertus de Puteo

1309       Henricus de Poto

1311       Henricus de Poto

1316       Ulvin Von Puteo

1301       Bertramus de Puteo

1313       Henricus de Poto

1320       Henricus de Poto

1322       Alvinus de Poto

1323       Hendrich Van Dem Putte (De Pote)

1334       Bertrammus de Puteo

1336       B. de Puteo

 [1336    Bertammus de Puteo

1336       Bertam Van Dem Putte

1338       Bertramus de Puteo

1347       Bertrammus de Puteo

1360       Bertold Vamme Putte

1369       Segebode Van Dam Putte Procurator

Abt. 1370     Johann Pette [de putte]

Abt. 1375     Theodoricus de Puteo Procurator

Abt. 1400 Segebode Van Dem Putte

Abt. 1390     Rotgerus de Puteo Procurator

The German name Segebode means Victor's Master.  The German "sieger" means victor while "  "boden" means master. 

The name Segenboden, Sgenboggen, and Segebog in the 1600's were common surnames in Dortmund, Germany while almost absent elsewhere.

Segebode is according to Dortmunder Urkundenbuch also seen as Sygbodo.  There was a "Segebode dictus pape" in dortmund in 1312 whose name means it appears Victor's Master the Priest. 

In 1361, there was "Segebode fermentator" whose name likely meant brewer.  There was also Segebode Rike likely Segebode the Rich or Wealthy.

The de Putte or de Puteo family also had the nickname Gronepape particularly Henry de Putte.  Gronepape seems to mean "green priest" likely meaning a deacon.  In Dortmund an Alberto was also called [or genannt] Gronepape dyacono [Diaken] or Albert the Diaconocon. 

the Late Latin word diaconocon meant deacon, which is in Lutheranism is a layperson subordinate to that of pastor, an elder, or an assistant minister. 

Wulvino dictus Pape was a father or priest in 1316.  In the document that mentions Wulvino Pape, mention is made of Albertus de Puteo who was "pfarrer zu Bacarach" or the parish priest of Baccarach.

Siboto Papa was priest of Dortmund in 1332.

Another word for pit, or excavation, is Latin "fossa" or "fossam".  A look at early Dortmund shows a number of people with the last name Fossam.  In 1268, Rutgerus extra Fossam and Bertrammus prope Fossam are mentioned in one document.  Rutgerus was near the pit, and Bertrammus was outside the pit.    Others were Wernero prope Fossam, Johannes juxta [next to the] Fossam, Wasmodus prope Fossam, Thidericus juxta Fossam,  and Megheldus apud Fossam.    

The Bructeri

The Anglo-Saxon tribe, the Bructeri were powerful and dwelt initially north of the Lippe River.  They later occupied the territory on the south side of the Lippe River. 

They derived their name from the marshes, or bruchen, in Germany, which were a significant element of the region.  Bruckteri meant brook people. 

The Putman/Pootman family may have descended from the Bructeri.

Initially the Bructeri lived east of the Rhine, north of the Lippe River, and west of the Ems River.  Later they became part of the Franks called the river people or the Riparian Franks.

The Dutch-American Putman [Pootman] family Y-DNA is closed to that of the Brohle-de Plater family of West Hemmerde, Germany, which is southeast of Dortmund, Germany.

Hemmerde is first mentioned in 875 as "Hamarithi Villa in Pago Borahtron" that is translated as "Hemmerde Village, District of Bructeri".

Another early "close relative" of the Pootman family was the Vom Broich family whose name also meant marsh, hollow, or brook.

 

Germanen AD 50 

 

Names for pitman or well-man in Germany included the Latin word "puteus" and the German word "brunnen". 

German "brunnen" is connected with the word brook. 

The review of I1 Y-DNA that is close to the Putman YDNA and shows some interesting things. 

http://www.familytreedna.com/public/yDNA_I1/

The following are close matches:  Vom Broich from Kuerten, Germany;  [and Bruno from Paris, France;]  and from Ancesstry.com the Brohle-de Plater from Germany.  

The Broich and Bruno families are I1-DF29+.

Bruhle-de Plater family is found at the following link:

http://dna.ancestry.com/compareY.aspx?uid=161654&tid=18447

The surnames Bruno, Broich,  and Broehl and Pootman [perhaps Vom Brunnen de Puteo]  seem to point to a common place name a well, spring, or brook, which in German is a brunnen or bruch and the Bruckteri people. 

In German today, bruch means marshland while steinbruch means a stone quarry or pit. 

 

Potina Regio

On the map below, Duisburg is shown as the Latin town of Dispargum and is located southeast of the Caesia Silva.  The later name is also Latin and may mean Blue Woods.  North of Dispargum runs the Luppia Fluss that is today known as the Lippe River. 

South of Dispargum is the stronghold of Castrum Novaesum, the City of Neuss. 

West of Dispargum is the area that seems to have the name Potina Regio that may mean the Region of the Goddess Potina.  Potina Regio seems to have been an early area with a number of water filled pits used for drinking.

Potina was the goddess of the child's first drink.  Her name  comes from Latin "potus" that means to drink.  The word potus is connected with Latin "puteus" meaning a well or spring  from which one would get a drink of water.

In Germany, Puette means well, spring, pit, or mine. 

Also near the Lippe River is what seems to be Tricesimea . . . Legio 30, which may be Tremonia or Dortmound. 

Trecesimea was a town in Gallia Belgia on the Rhine River.

 

Potina Region - Belgii Veterus Typus

 

SNP's Values are the True Predictors of One's Ancestors!

For many years, we defined lineage in terms of one's Y-DNA mostly according to one's STR Marker values.   They are the 12, 25, 37, 67 and 111 STR markers that are seen so commonly. The steady increase in the number of Y-STR markers helped refine our understanding of who we match and who we don't match particularly within people with the same surname.

The Dutch-American Pootman/Putman family descendants here in the United States will match 63 or more of 67 STR markers.

We are now on the verge of entering a new genealogical era with the assistance from another part of the y-Chromosome - the SNPs. SNP stands for [Y-Chromosome] Single Nucleotide Polymorphism.

SNP mutation occurs only once in history and is passed down to all of the male descendants of the man who first had that mutation. YSNP’s will in the future define family lineages.

Over centuries, SNPs built up a progression that allowed scientists to catalog and deduce a family's place in the Family Tree of Man. The branches of SNP’s are called Haplogroups.

The Dutch-American familiy Haplogroup is currently designated simply as I1* or I1 DF29+.  I1 is designated by the SNP M253 and DF29 markers being positive while other markers in the I1 haplogroup are negative. 
Haplogroups were assigned capital letters of the alphabet initially and are further broken down into branches such as I1f1a.

The identification of SNPs has exploded and is now the new frontier in Y-DNA research on a genealogical level.

Haplogroup names are getting much longer. The longer names indicate that more and more branching is being discovered.  However, while others may have a long Haplogroup name, such as in the R1 Haplogroup family, the Dutch-American Pootman/Putman family still is classified simply as I1* of I1 DF29+. 

I had a number of SNP’s tested that include the following list where + means I tested positive for the marker and where – means I tested negative for the marker:DF29+, L22-, M161-, M170+, M21-, M223-, M227-, M253+, M258+, M26-, M307+, M72-, P109-, P19+, P259-, P30+, P37.2-, P38+,Z58-, Z63-.

DF29+ means by itself that we are I1* DF29+

M21- means that I we are not I1a or one of its subgroups.

M227- indicates that I am not I1b . . .

P259- indicates that I are not I1c . . .

L22- indicated that I  am not I1d . . .

Z58- and Z63- mean I am not I1f or I1g . . .
 

Below are the current Haplogroups in the I1 Tree:


• I1 L64, L75, L80, L81, L118, L121/S62, L123, L124/S64, L125/S65, L157.1, L186, L187, M253,
M307.2/P203.2, M450/S109, P30, P40, S63, S66, S107, S108, S110, S111
• • I1* [This is the group to which the Pootman/Putman belongs]
• • I1a M21
• • I1b M227
• • • I1b* -
• • • I1b1 M72
• • I1c M507/P259
• • I1d L22/S142
• • • I1d* -
• • • I1d1 P109
• • • I1d2 L205
• • • I1d3 L287
• • • • I1d3* -
• • • • I1d3a L258
• • • I1d4 L300
• • I1e L211
• • I1f Z58
• • • I1f* -
• • • I1f1 Z59
• • • • I1f1* -
• • • • I1f1a Z60, Z61
• • • • • I1f1a* -
• • • • • I1f1a1 Z62
• • • • • • I1f1a1* -
• • • • • • I1f1a1a Z140, Z141
• • • • • • • I1f1a1a* -
• • • • • • • I1f1a1a1 L338
• • • I1f2 Z138, Z139
• • • • I1f2* -
• • • • I1f2a Z73
• • I1g Z63
The SNP is here!

Within a year or a few years we'll see family lineages with their own defining SNP.
As the SNP research progresses, we will see Haplogroup branches tracked into historic times that will connect with our own paper trail down to our current written history.

 

The Earliest Pootman Region

The haplogroup or type to which our Pootman now Putman family belonged is best described as I1* or I1-DF29+. 

It also may be described as I1-AAA [or ABA] according to the work of Terry Robb. 

See the large picture of northwest Europe and chart that follow that show the "AAA Homeland" and Y-DNA values:

The Putman/Pootman family STR and SNP Y-DNA values are very close to those of the Vom Broich family and others that appears to be I1-AAA.

Also, below from Ysearch.com, the Pootman/Putman Y-DNA is shown the displays STR marker results. 

 The Putman family is closest to Terry Robb's I1-ABA, but I think we really are I1-AAA:

 

I1 Migration Routes

http://www.goggo.com/terry/HaplogroupI1/


User ID

Last Name

Origin

3
9
3

3
9
0

1
9

3
9
1

3
8
5
a

3
8
5
b

4
2
6

3
8
8

4
3
9

3
8
9
|
1

3
9
2

3
8
9
|
2

4
5
8

4
5
9
a

4
5
9
b

4
5
5

4
5
4

4
4
7

4
3
7

4
4
8

4
4
9

4
6
4
a

4
6
4
b

4
6
4
c

4
6
4
d

4
6
0

H
4

Y
C
A
I
I
a

Y
C
A
I
I
b

4
5
6

6
0
7

5
7
6

5
7
0

C
D
Y
a

C
D
Y
b

4
4
2

4
3
8

4
2
5

4
4
4

4
4
6

5
3
1

5
7
8

3
9
5
S
1
a

3
9
5
S
1
b

5
9
0

5
3
7

6
4
1

4
7
2

4
0
6
S
1

5
1
1

4
1
3
a

4
1
3
b

5
5
7

GTZGV

Putman

Netherlands

13

22

14

10

13

14

11

14

12

13

11

29

14

8

9

8

11

23

16

20

28

12

14

15

16

10

10

19

21

14

14

16

20

35

36

12

10

12

13

13

11

8

15

15

8

11

10

8

9

9

23

25

16

3J7YJ

I1-ABB Anglo-Saxon Norway

Unknown

13

22

14

10

13

14

11

14

11

12

11

28

15

8

9

8

11

23

16

20

28

12

14

15

16

10

10

19

21

14

14

17

20

35

38

12

10

12

13

13

11

8

15

15

8

11

10

8

9

9

23

25

16

JZ8SJ

Shiver

Unknown

13

23

14

10

13

14

11

14

11

12

11

28

15

8

9

8

11

23

16

20

28

12

14

15

16

10

10

19

21

14

14

16

19

35

36

12

10

12

13

13

11

8

15

15

8

11

10

8

9

9

23

25

15

S9YN2

i1-ABA,anglosaxon, Denmark

Unknown

13

22

14

10

13

14

11

14

11

12

11

28

15

8

9

8

11

23

16

20

29

12

14

15

16

10

10

19

21

14

14

16

20

35

37

12

10

12

13

13

11

8

15

15

8

11

10

8

9

9

23

25

16

 

Am Gen Putt & Putt, Germany

 

I tried to find a place in the “Rohrpott” or Ruhr Valley of Germany that was called Putt.  I thought that from such a place our Pootman family may have originated.   

Looking at the Familysearch.org website, I found that nearly all the Putt’s  were from the Heinsberg, Germany, area, and upon further investigation I found that there was a small village called Putt just a couple of miles south of Heinsberg.   

This Putt family went by the name of An Gen Putt and Am Putt. 

Heinsberg is mentioned on Wikipedia as the ancient home of coal mining in the Ruhrpott or Ruhr Valley.

I currrently don't feel weare connected to the Am Gen Putt famly.

Am Gen Putt Time Line

Births and Baptisms

Casparus an Gen Putt:  Born to Petri An Gen Putt and Maria Finnemans. 14 Jan 1618. Heinsberg Catholic Church.

Gerardus Aengeen Putt:  Born to same parents. 8 Apr 1626.  Same Church.

Joannes Tho Putt:  Born to Merten Tho Putt and Bilgen.  28 Jun 1662.  Moenchenglabach Catholic Church.

Wilhelm Putt:  Born to Peter Putt and Bilgen.  18 Jun 1678.  Monechenglach Catholic Church.

Vitus Putt:  Born to Alffs Putt and Oeletgen. 23 Oct 1685.  Moenchenglabach Catholic Church.

Reinerus:  Same parents.  Same Church.  3 Nov 1687

Sybilla Putt:  Same parents.  Same Church 28 Aug 1695

Many more entries are extent.

 

Puet and Pott

Puett The word Puett in Low German means pit, fountain, or pool

Puett is related to the Dutch wowrd put, the French word puits, and the English word Pit In Old High German the word is pfuzzi Koelsch: Puetz Latin puteus also means well.  Puett denotes in the Ruhr German and in the Aachen-Heinsberg area a coalfield or a mine.

Puett is in in Low German Pütt.

Today the word Puett is a synomyn for the mining industryPütt = coalier.  Püttrologe = Miner Nobleman.

The local dialect of German is commonly called Ruhrdeutsch or Ruhrpottdeutsch.

Locals prefer to call the Ruhr  Ruhrpott", where "Pott" is a derivate of "Pütt" (a pitman's term for mine; the English "pit") or "Revier".

Mining began in the south of the Ruhr and in the Ruhr Valley where the seams were exposed.  Then the mining shifted further and further north.

Coal was mined first only from the surface and then deeper and deeper until a funnel-shaped pit was created in the ground.  Water would ingress and make further exploration impossible.  This type of coal mining continued until the 16th Century. It produced pits or puett Latin puteus a well.

In some parts of North Rhine-Westphalia, someone who works in a (coal) mine is a Püttmann , sometimes called Pütti or Püttek . When the miner noble was described, they call him or her the Püttrologe or Püttologe.

 

Ten Puette and Puettmann Family, Dulmen, Germany

In 1335, the Koster of Benninghausen mentioned Johann de Puteo, Richter, in Soest, Germany.  Johann De Puteo may have been from a different family then the Dortmund De Puteo family.

In the area of Kaldenkirchen, Monchengladbach, Viersen, Lueth, and Tegelen on the Maas River and near the Dutch Border west of Dortmund variations of the man at the well or man at the pit surnames are Poet, Poets, Puete, Peth, Puth, Pothen, Putter, Putten, Putz, and Puyt.

The surnames Pootmann and Puettmann with spellings with one "n" at the end are seem near south and west of Lippe River to the Maas River while the surnames with two "nn's" were found around Muenster and Duelmen, Germany. 

The name Pootman/Potman is found south of the Lippe River while Puettmann is found north of the Lippe River.

The name Pootman was associated with Evangelical or Protestant churches while the surname Puettmann was associated with Catholic Churches.

The given name Victor came into the Puettmann family in the early 1600's about the same time that Victor Pootman of Aalburg, North Brabant, Netherlands, was born. 

Victor Pootman seems to be the father of the Dutch immigrant to Albany, NY, in 1661 Johannes Pootman.

However, since the Puettman's were Catholic, it does not seem likely the North-American Pootman/Putman family  descends from the Puettman's.

There were three Victor Puttmann’s who were born between 1705 and 1720 in Duelmen, Germany. 

Below is a list of Ten Putte's who appear to  change into Puettmann's:

The Ten Puette and Puettmann Time Line

Dulmen, Germany

1460, Evert Ten Putte was a witness. 

 1489, Bernd Ten Putte is mentioned with his wife Hille.

n 1495, Bernd Ten Putte's house and lot were mentioned

1496, Johan Ten Putte was a witness.

 1500, Evert Ten Putte and his wife Stine are mentioned.

1502, Bernd Ten Putte is mentioned.

1514, Bernd Ten Putte is called burger or citizen of Dulmen.

1566, Bernd Thon Putte and his wife Anna are recorded.

1598, Berd Putmann is called a court usher.

In 1602, Evert Putman and his wife Heilken are listed.

In 1602, a Gerdt Puttmann is listed.

In 1612, Gert is again listed.

In 1643, a Bernhardus Puttmann was born to Bernhardus Puttmanm.

In 1646, an Evert Putman marries Elizabeth Richters.

In 1705, a Victor Puttmann was born to Johann Bernard Puttmann.

In 1706, a Victor Puttmann was born to Melchior Puttmann.

In 1719, a Victor Anton Puttman was born to Hermann Puttmann.

In 1726, a Victor Puttmann married Maria Horstman.   

 

Pootsmanns-hof

On the internet, a niece picture of Pootsmanns-hof or Pootman's House, is found.  The house was later called Pott's Hoff and is in Stockum, Germany, northwest of Voerde. 

http://www.stockumer-heimatfreunde.de/galerie-katen.html

Gordt Pootsmann was born in the house in 1640.  The court was the property of the order of Saint John of Wessel about 1600. 

Pootsmans - Hof

Gordt  Pootman owed his name it was said to the very wet surface of the surrounding court ground. 

To the north and west of Pootshof from the overflowing of the Mombach at high tide a rather large "poot" or puddle was formed.   "Poot" is a German variant name for a puddle  that also in German is spelled "pfutze" 

     The descendants of Poot or Pootsmans were called Pottman around 1800 . . ..  The court is now called Pott's Hoff.   

Suhle and Pfuhl

In German "suhle" and "pfuhl" mean a mire, pool, or wallowing place.   

The migration of the Anglo-Saxons and Juts to England likely did not  take place directly from the Denmark area, but rather along a  route from Saxony to the Lippe River Valley and then to Flanders and southwestern England. 

This migration is seen in establishment of place names with the root "sol" as in Solengen, Germany, which is south of Dortmound, Germany.  In Anglo-Saxon, "sol" means a wallowing place that is in German also called a "pfuhl" a pool or "pfutze" a puddle. 

There is a Putte, Germany, that is west of Stralsund in the northern most part of Germany.  The large local pond there is called Putte See. 

I looked at the name Von Putten in regards to Putte, Germany, and also looked at instances of the name "de Puteo" in Nieder-Saxony or Lower Saxony and found that Vom Soden was an equivalent to De Puteo both meaning the person from the spring or well. 

The old Anglo-Saxon word "syd" means wallowing place while "pytt" is  translated as "pit".   

Along the route from Denmark to the Lippe River there area a number of place names that mean spring or well such as Brunswick ["brunnen" in German means well and a "wick" was a town], Paderborne [Borne also means well], and places with the root "sol" such as Solengen. 

The Vom Soden family is anciently from the area near Hanover, Germany.

The word "sul" is older then "sol" in the Anglo-Saxon langugage and you may see this on the way from Denmark to England with "sul"  being used near Denmark and "sol" being used more frequently nearer to England.